Amara Nwosu

MBCHB FRCP PhD


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Palliative Care, Architecture and Design symposium (PADS): 2nd conference coming soon

Funding has been secured to deliver the 2nd Palliative Care, Architecture and Design Symposium (PADS) in 2020. Engage (University of Liverpool) has agreed to fund the event which will bring together researchers from different backgrounds to develop research methodology, to explore how architecture, design and technology can improve quality of life for people with palliative care needs. The event follows the overwhelming success of the first symposium which took place in November 2018.

Further information will follow. Information of the inaugral PADS conference can be found through the following links:

Presentations from PADS 2018

Overview of PADS event in the European Association for Palliative Care Blog


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Technology in Palliative Care Study Consensus Meeting Completed

The Technology in Palliative Care (TIP) study consensus meeting was completed successfully on Friday 6th September, in the University of Liverpool. The TIP study (funded by Liverpool Clinical Commissing Group) aims to identify the research priorities for digital health in palliative care. The consensus meeting was attended by 12 experts, and followed two international Delphi rounds which were completed earlier this year.

The consensus meeting will be followed by a Patient and Public Engagement event (funded by Wellcome Trust, University of Liverpool Health and Life Sciences PPE scheme) which will take place in Marie Curie Hospice Liverpool on the 27th of September.

Following this event, the final report will be written and the agreed priorities will be submitted for publication in a peer reviewed journal and widely disseminated.

For more information about the TIP study please contact Dr Amara Nwosu through the contact section of this website.

Infographic vector created by studiogstock – www.freepik.com


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Robotic technology for palliative and supportive care: Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats

How could robots help us at the end of life? Check out this open access article I published with some great co-authors.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269216319857628

What is already known about the topic?

  • Medical robots have mainly been used to support surgical procedures and for a variety of assistive uses in dementia and elderly care.
  • There has been limited debate about the potential opportunities and risks of robotics in other areas of palliative, supportive and end-of-life care.

What this paper adds?

  • The potential opportunities of robotics in palliative, supportive and end-of-life care include a number of assistive, therapeutic, social and educational uses.
  • There is concern that robots will exacerbate healthcare inequalities, disrupt the workforce and reduce face-to-face human interaction.

Implications for practice, theory or policy

  • Future work should evaluate the health-related, economic, societal and ethical implications of using robotic technology in palliative, supportive and end-of-life care.
  • There is a need for collaborative research to establish use-cases and policy recommendations to guide the appropriate use of robots for people with serious illness.

CLICK below to access the artilce

Nwosu AC, Sturgeon B, McGlinchey T, Goodwin CDG, Behera A, Mason S, Stanley S, Payne TR. Robotic technology for palliative and supportive care: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Palliative Medicine 2019.


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Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) as a method to compare body composition differences according to cancer stage and type – ScienceDirect

I’m delighted to announce my latest publication. This article describes the potential to use Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA – a non-invasive body composition assessment tool) to evaluate body composition differences between cancer groups. This is the first paper in the academic literature to report how BIVA using a z-score methodology, can study body composition, according to cancer type, stage, gender and ethnicity.

The open access paper can be found completely free through the link below:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405457718304066


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Robots at home event – University of Liverpool 08/03/2019

I had a great time presenting my work on robotics in palliative care at the Robots @ Home event in the University of Liverpool. I discussed the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of robotic technology in relation to palliative care supportive care. I’m happy to discuss the next steps of my work and collaboration potential. Feel free to contact me.


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Futurism in Palliative: An overview of the Palliative Care, Architecture and Design Symposium (PADS 2018) | EAPC Blog

My article on the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) blog describes the inaugural Palliative Care, Architecture and Design Symposium (PADS). On 12 November 2018, 50 delegates attended the inaugural Palliative Care, Architecture and Design Symposium (PADS) in the University of Liverpool (funded by engage@liverpool, University of Liverpool). We applied futuristic thinking to palliative care through a collaborative meeting of academics, clinicians, and the public, to discuss ideas related to design and future provision of palliative care. The full article can be found on the link below.

https://eapcnet.wordpress.com/2019/02/25/futurism-in-palliative-an-overview-of-the-palliative-care-architecture-and-design-symposium-pads-2018/


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Shortlist for the 2019 Clinical Research Rising Star of the year award of the North West Coast

I’m delighted to be shortlisted for the 2019 Clinical Research Rising Star of the year award for the North West Coast. Irrespective of the eventual outcome, I’m looking forward to the 7thof March events cremony at the Hilton hotel, Liverpool.

More information about the awards can be found below:

http://www.nwcawards.co.uk/2019-finalists


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Technology in Palliative Care (TIP) study

Technology in Palliative Care (TIP) Study: Priority Setting to Improve the Care of Patients with Advanced Cancer

 

We need your help to identify the research priorities for technology in palliative care.

My name is Dr Amara Nwosu and I am an Consultant in Palliative Medicine and an Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer at the Palliative Care Institute Liverpool (PCIL), at the University of Liverpool in the UK.

My colleague Tamsin McGlinchey (Research Assistant, PCIL) and I are currently undertaking the Technology in Palliative Care (TIP) Study.

Aims and Objectives of the Study
Establish ‘priority areas’ to influence further research and development into how technology can improve the care and experience of patients with advanced cancer/palliative care. The project has the following objectives:

  • Objective 1: Scoping review: identify existing uses and examples of how technology can be used to support the delivery of healthcare, identifying opportunities for palliative care.
  • Objective 2 (research study): 2 stage Delphi process for consensus on what the ‘priority areas’ for technology intervention/studies in palliative care should be.
  • Objective 3: Develop an International Collaboration to facilitate and support future grant applications.

Why have we contacted you?
To invite you to take part in the Delphi study (Objective 2 above). We are hoping for a wide range of participants with a diversity of experience and expertise, and we would value your thoughts on the future role and priorities for technology in palliative care.

Please read the Participant Information Sheet which provides details of what to expect if you decide to take part.
If you wish to nominate a colleague who you think would be interested in this study, please forward this email to them.

Click to Begin
Round 1 Delphi Questionnaire


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Palliative Care, Architecture & Design Symposium (#PADS2018), 12th November, University of Liverpool

The inaugural Palliative Care, Architecture & Design Symposium (#PADS2018) will take place on the 12th November, University of Liverpool, Foresight Centre, 0900 – 1700.

By 2040 the UK need for palliative care is likely to increase by 40%; however, by then the most likely place of death will be nursing homes. Consequently, this symposium asks what work can to done now to re-design palliative care to meet the needs of people over the next 20 years or so. This redesign includes how be develop services, build homes and other buildings, how we use technology, design hospice and hospital services.

This symposium will bring together researchers from different backgrounds to develop research methodology, to explore how architecture, design and technology can improve quality of life for people with palliative care needs. Several speakers across a range of disciplines have been confirmed (see attached programme).

The event is supported by a number of organisations, including: Engage Liverpool (University of Liverpool), the Centre for Humanities and Social Sciences of Health Medicine and Technology (CHSSoHMT), the Global Digital Exemplar Programme, Royal Liverpool & Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) North West Clinical Research Network (CRN).

The event is free. A lunch will be provided. It will offer a wonderful opportunity for collaborative research and networking. ALL WELCOME!

Further information can be found from:
https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/engage/events/2018-2019/palliative-care-architecture-design-technology/

or by contacting Dr Amara Nwosu: anwosu@liverpool.ac.uk

To register please click the link(s) below